VLI – Issue 04 (2) – 2015

VLIcover100
Vocabulary Learning and Instruction
Volume 4, Number 2
December 2015
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v04.2.2187-2759

Full issue: download pdf

Table of contents

Articles
Pages
Letter from the Editor
Raymond Stubbe
 iv
A Japanese Word Association Database of English
George Higginbotham, Ian Munby and John P. Racine
1-20 pdf
On Using Corpus Frequency, Dispersion, and Chronological Data to Help Identify Useful Collocations
James Rogers, et al. 
21-37 pdf
Replacing Translation Tests With Yes/No Tests
Raymond Stubbe
38-48 pdf
Commentary
Low-Confidence Responses on the Vocabulary Size Test
Paul Hutchinson
49-51 pdf
Four SLA PhD programs
Cardiff University PhD Program in Applied Linguistics (Lexical Studies) 52-55
Carnegie Mellon University Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition, Department of Modern Languages 56-58
The University of Nottingham Vocabulary Research Group 59-63
Victoria University of Wellington PhD in Applied Linguistics, Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition 64-65

 

VLI – Issue 04 (1) – 2015

VLIcover100
Vocabulary Learning and Instruction
Volume 4, Number 1
October 2015
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v04.1.2187-2759
Full issue: download pdf

Table of contents

Article
Pages  pdf
Letter from the Editor
Raymond Stubbe
 iv
A Test of the New General Service List
Tim Stoeckel & Phillip Bennett
1-8 pdf
Psychometric Properties of Word Association Test with Regard to Adolescent EFL Learners
Hye Won Shin
9-15 pdf
“I Don’t Know” Use and Guessing on the Bilingual Japanese Vocabulary Size Test: A Preliminary Report
Kurtis McDonald & Mayumi Asaba
16-25 pdf
An Empirical Examination of the Effect of Guessing on Vocabulary Size Test Scores
Stuart McLean, Brandon Kramer & Jeffrey Stewart
26-35 pdf
Second Language Vocabulary Assessment Studies: Validity Evidence and Future Directions
Rie Koizumi
36-46 pdf
An Investigation of Different Text Levels on L2 Learners’ Vocabulary Learning Rates in an Extensive Reading Program
Anna C-S. Chang
47-57 pdf
Measuring Knowledge of Words with Multiple Meanings
Yuko Hoshino
58-65 pdf
Are Learners Aware of Effective Ways to Learn Second Language Vocabulary from Retrieval? Perceived Effects of Relative Spacing, Absolute Spacing, and Feedback Timing on Vocabulary Learning
Tatsuya Nakata
66-73 pdf
Mastery Sentences: A Window into the Interplay between Word Knowledge Types
Andrew Gallacher
74-82 pdf
Researching Vocabulary in the EFL Context: A Commentary on Four Studies for JALT Vocabulary SIG
Stuart Webb
83-94 pdf

VLI – Issue 03 (1) – 2014

VLIcover100
Vocabulary Learning and Instruction
Volume 3, Number 1
December 2014
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.1.2187-2759
Full issue: download pdf

Table of contents

Articles
Pages
Letter from the Editor
Raymond Stubbe
iv
Vocabulary Research in the Modern Language Journal: A Bibliometric Analysis
Paul M. Meara
1-28 pdf
Do Japanese Students Overestimate or Underestimate Their Knowledge of English Loanwords More than Non-loanwords on YesNo Vocabulary Tests?
Raymond Stubbe
29-43 pdf
Is the Vocabulary Level of the Reading Section of the TOEFL Internet-Based Test Beyond the Lexical Level of Japanese Senior High School Students?
Masaya Kaneko
44-50 pdf
A Methodology for Identification of the Formulaic Language Most Representative of High-frequency Collocations
James Rogers, Chris Brizzard, Frank Daulton, Cosmin Florescu, Ian MacLean, Kayo Mimura, John O’Donoghue, Masaya Okamoto, Gordon Reid, & Yoshiaki Shimada
51-65 pdf
Commentary
Reaction Time Methodologies and Lexical Access in Applied Linguistics
John P. Racine
66-70 pdf

VLI 3(1): Rogers et al. (2014)

A Methodology for Identification of the Formulaic Language Most Representative of High-frequency Collocations
James Rogers (a), Chris Brizzard (a), Frank Daulton (b), Cosmin Florescu (c), Ian MacLean (a), Kayo Mimura (a), John O’Donoghue (d), Masaya Okamoto (e), Gordon Reid (a) and Yoshiaki Shimada (f)
(a) Kansai Gaidai University; (b) Ryukoku University; (c) University of New England; (d) Osaka Board of Education; (e) University of Manchester; (f) State University of New York at Albany
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.1.rogers.et.al
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Abstract
Researchers have stated that learning formulaic language is key to
achieving fluency. It has also been stated that studying vocabulary in
this way is more efficient than isolated vocabulary learning. However,
there is a lack of research in regards to which formulaic language should
be taught. There is a further lack of research about how such formulaic
language can be identified. This study aimed to evaluate a methodology
for identifying the most common formulaic language. It compared multiword
unit identification results from both 500 and 1,000 example
sentences and quantified how often native speakers opt to extend multiword
units beyond their core pivot and collocate. This study also
identified and quantified colligational issues affecting multi-word unit
identification. The results showed no difference in multi-word unit
identification between 500 and 1,000 example sentences, that native
speakers opted to extend multi-word units more than half of the time, and
that colligational issues only affected approximately 3% of the items
examined. This study concluded that 500 example sentences are just as
reliable as 1,000 when identifying multi-word units. It also found that
extending multi-word units beyond their core pivot and collocate is an
essential step researchers should take. This study also found that a
colligational treatment is necessary if the aim is to achieve the most
accurate data; however, the percentage of items that were affected were
small and the methodology time-consuming. This finding indicates that
there is a need for improved software to better automate the steps taken.

Citation
Rogers, J., Brizzard, C., Daulton, F., Florescu, C., MacLean, I., Mimura, K., O’Donoghue, J., Okamoto, M., Reid, G., & Shimada, Y. (2014). A methodology for identification of the formulaic language most representative of high-frequency collocations. Vocabulary Learning and Instruction, 3 (1), 51-65. doi: 10.7820/vli.v03.1.rogers.et.al

VLI – Issue 03 (2) – 2014

VLIcover100
Vocabulary Learning and Instruction
Volume 3, Number 2
September 2014
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.2.2187-2759
Full issue: download pdf

Table of contents

Article
Pages Link
Letter from the Editor
Raymond Stubbe
i  pdf
A New General Service List: The Better Mousetrap We’ve Been Looking for?
Charles Browne
 1-10  pdf
Analysing the Effectiveness of Textbooks for Vocabulary Retention
Rachael Ruegg & Cherie Brown
 11-18  pdf
Effects of Glosses and Reviewing of Glossed Words on L2 Vocabulary Learning through Reading
Makoto Yoshii
 19-30  pdf
Effects of Instruction on Yes-No Responses to L2 Collocations
Junko Yamashita
 31-37  pdf
Vocabulary in a Second Language: Selection, Acquisition, and Testing: A Commentary on Four Studies for JALT Vocabulary SIG
Batia Laufer
 38-46  pdf
Estimations of Japanese University Learners’ English Vocabulary Sizes Using the Vocabulary Size Test
Stuart McLean, Nicholas Hogg, & Brandon Kramer
 47-55  pdf
Local Item Dependence on the Vocabulary Levels Test Revisited
Tadamitsu Kamimoto
 56-68  pdf
Test Taking and DK Use on the Vocabulary Size Test
Dawn Lucovich
 69-77  pdf
Estimating Learners’ Vocabulary Size under Item Response Theory
Aaron Gibson & Jeffrey Stewart
 78-84  pdf
A Review of Four Studies on Measuring Vocabulary Knowledge
Akiyo Hirai
 85-92  pdf

VLI 3(1): Meara (2014)

Vocabulary Research in the Modern Language Journal: A Bibliometric Analysis
Paul M. Meara
Swansea University and Cardiff University
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.1.meara

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Abstract
This paper reports a bibliometric analysis of a set of 201 articles which was published in The Modern Language Journal (MLJ) between 1916 and 2010. All these articles deal with vocabulary acquisition. The paper reports an all-inclusive author co-citation analysis of this data, in an attempt to sketch out the historical development of vocabulary acquisition research. The paper presents a set of maps which shows whose work is being cited in the Journal. Co-citation links between cited sources allow us to identify research clusters which are characterised by patterns of citations. This paper uses these maps to show how the predominant research focus has changed significantly over the period studied. Much of the earlier work published in MLJ no longer figures in more recent research. The more recent research appears to be much more inward-looking and self-referential than is the case for the earlier research. This paper suggests that a co-citation analysis of research in a single journal does not capture the full richness of vocabulary research, which in turn raises some interesting questions about the selectivity of journals and their research biases.

Citation
Meara, P.M. (2014). Vocabulary research in The Modern Language Journal: A bibliometric analysis. Vocabulary Learning and Instruction, 3(1), 1-28. doi: 10.7820/vli.v03.1.meara

VLI 3(1): Stubbe (2014)

Do Japanese Students Overestimate or Underestimate Their Knowledge of English Loanwords More than Non-loanwords on Yes–No Vocabulary Tests?
Raymond Stubbe
Kyushu Sangyo University
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.1.stubbe

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Abstract
English loanwords (LWs), gairaigo in Japanese, make up a much greater percentage of the Japanese language than many university English teachers realize, especially if their native language is not Japanese. Unfortunately, a gairaigo bias exists which has made these LWs unpopular amongst teachers and researchers. The aim of this study is to compare student over-estimation and under-estimation of their knowledge of English LWs on yes–no vocabulary tests with an equal number of non-loanwords (NLWs). Undergraduate students from four Japanese universities (n 0 455) took two vocabulary tests of their receptive and passive recall knowledge of LWs and NLWs. Six LWs and six NLWs from each of the eight JACET 8000 levels were tested in a self- report yes–no test followed by a passive recall translation test (English to Japanese) of the same 96 items. Overall, over-estimation rates were nearly equal at 24.6% for LWs and 25.8% for NLWs. Additionally, over- estimation was more prevalent for NLWs at the higher three frequency levels (1K–3K), nearly equal with LWs at the 4K level and then more prevalent for the LWs at the lower four frequency levels (5K–8K), suggesting that student knowledge of NLWs is weak even at the higher frequency levels. Under-estimation, on the other hand, was much more prevalent for LWs (4.4% versus 0.7%). Six of the 48 LWs actually had higher passive recall test scores than yes–no test scores. These results suggest that although students do not over-estimate their knowledge of LWs more than NLWs on yes–no vocabulary tests, they do under- estimate their LW knowledge much more than NLWs.

Keywords
over-estimation of lexical knowledge; loanwords; yes-no vocabulary tests; passive recall knowledge; JACET 8000.

Citation
Stubbe, R. (2014). Do Japanese students overestimate or underestimate their knowledge of English loanwords more than non-loanwords on yes–no vocabulary tests? Vocabulary Learning and Instruction, 3(1), 29-43. doi: 10.7820/vli.v03.1.stubbe

VLI 3(1): Kaneko (2014)

Is the Vocabulary Level of the Reading Section of the TOEFL Internet-Based Test Beyond the Lexical Level of Japanese Senior High School Students?
Masaya Kaneko
Tokyo Denki University
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v03.1.kaneko
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Abstract
The main goal of the present study is to answer the question of whether the lexical level of the reading section of the TOEFL Internet-based Test (TOEFL iBT) is beyond the vocabulary level of Japanese senior high school graduates. The lexical level was measured in terms of text coverage. The present study builds upon Chujo and Oghigian’s study. The notable difference in methodology compared to earlier text coverage studies on the TOEFL is an examination of real past TOEFL iBTs. Two objectives are explored in the present study. First, this study aims to examine how well a vocabulary of 3,000 word families, which is the lexical size target for Japanese high school graduates set by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, enables students to comprehend reading passages in the TOEFL iBT. Second, it estimates a vocabulary size required to reach 95% and 98% coverage of these passages. Results showed that the most frequent 3,000 word families plus proper nouns as well as words that are defined in context yielded an average text coverage of 88.5% and that 6,000 word families plus proper nouns and defined words accounted for 95% of the text, and around 10,000 word families 98%. The findings suggest that Japanese high school graduates with a vocabulary of 3,000 word families would be expected to comprehend nearly 50% of reading passages in the TOEFL iBT and that learning a vocabulary beyond the 10,000-word frequency level may not be necessary unless 98% or more text coverage is required.

Citation
Kaneko, M. (2014). Is the vocabulary level of the reading section of the TOEFL Internet-based Test beyond the lexical level of Japanese senior high school students? Vocabulary Learning and Instruction, 3(1), 44-50. doi: 10.7820/vli.v03.1.kaneko

VLI – Issue 02 (1) – 2013

VLIcover100 Vocabulary Learning and Instruction
Volume 2, Number 1
September 2013
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.7820/vli.v02.1.2187-2759
Full issue: download pdf

Table of contents

Article
Pages Link
Letter from the Editor
Raymond Stubbe
i pdf
June 29, 2013 JALT Vocabulary SIG / CUE SIG Vocabulary Symposium – Vocabulary Learning Session
Re-examining Semantic Clustering: Insight from Memory Models
Tomoko Ishii
1-7 pdf
How L1 Loanwords Can Create a False Sense of Familiarity with L2 Vocabulary Meaning and Usage
Marie-Emilie Masson
8-14 pdf
Enhancing Self-efficacy in Vocabulary Learning: A Self-regulated Learning Approach
Atsushi Mizumoto
15-24 pdf
A Comparison of Lexical Feedback on Writing From Peers and a Teacher
Rachael Ruegg
25-31 pdf
Commentary on Four Studies for JALT Vocabulary SIG
Paul Nation
32-38 pdf
June 29, 2013 JALT Vocabulary SIG / CUE SIG Vocabulary Symposium – Vocabulary Assessment Session
Comparing Regression versus Correction Formula Predictions of Passive Recall Test Scores from Yes-No Test Results
Raymond Stubbe
39-46 pdf
Sources of Differential Item Functioning Between Korean and Japanese Examinees on a Second Language Vocabulary Test
Tim Stoeckel & Phil Bennett
47-55 pdf
Difficulties in Reading English Words: How Do Japanese Learners Perform on a Test of Phonological Deficit?
David Coulson, Mayumi Ariiso, Rina Kojima, & Masami Tanaka
56-63 pdf
Validating a Pictorial Vocabulary Size Test via the 3PL-IRT Model
Wen-Ta Tseng
64-73 pdf
Second Language Vocabulary Assessment Research: Issues and Challenges
Yo In’nami
74-81 pdf